The Long Game

***This article is much differently written and formatted than my usual posts because I felt the need to vent quickly and shortly. However, as you guys can see I’m back so expect regular posts from here on***

“The ability to discipline yourself to delay gratification in the short term in order to enjoy greater rewards in the long term, is the indispensable prerequisite for success.” Brain Tracy

For the majority of my childhood life forced me to delay gratification. As a child I didn’t grow up in the best of neighborhoods (actually, one of the worst) and my family didn’t have the financial means to live as smoothly as I would have liked. I can recall getting 50⊄ to a dollar at primary school because the family went through some extra rough financial patches. I remember being 14 years old throwing a tantrum at my dad because my friends were able to get things they wanted and I couldn’t. He let me finish then told me to suck it up and be grateful for what I had. In secondary school, when I was given an allowance he would always say, “it isn’t much but make it work” and this carried on until I got to college. I had to “ban my belly” for the sake of enjoying something at a later date. With the money for school, I would save 90% of it to have the chance to go to the movies with a girl or chill somewhere over the weekend. At the time I didn’t fully understand why I had to be the one to live this life; I also didn’t like that I did. But many years later and a little wiser, as I observe people around me more, I’ve come to appreciate those rough times because it built true character in me.

This pushed me to become innovative with the way I spent my money and how to make it. When I first understood how to torrent movies, I began selling DVDs to my teachers for $10 and when I built up a little capital, decided to sell anything that could get me money. You see, these experiences allowed me to see life not through a rose-tinted glass but the glass that’s clearest. Born from it is my love for business and entrepreneurship which to this day has stuck with me. If I didn’t go through those experiences of not having I don’t think I would have been this hungry to push myself and move forward in life. You see, the long game is not one that is wanted in todays world, people my age have grown up in an era where everything is provided quickly. From the evolution of high speed internet to Tinder, where you can easily bed more women than our ancestors could have ever imagined after no more than a 5 minute conversation. These luxuries afford us the opportunity to focus on other things; some use it to provide value for themselves and others whilst most become a permanent resident of consumer-town. Back when these things weren’t easily acquired you had to work ferociously to move up in society and because of that, people never felt entitled. They understood the long game for what it was and didn’t complain, but rather adapted to the circumstances life threw and dealt with it accordingly. This article is my first since being back and it really is for those people who are forced to live below their means for the sake of a much more fruitful tomorrow. Though it may seem that success is touching everyone but yourself, see it as success’ flirtations giving you frequent eye contact to let you know your approach is welcomed. Though you may falter and give in to temptations do not make it a frequent habit because as the Stoics believed, excessive pleasure can enslave you and create in you a dependency that must be fulfilled. If you are impulsive, learn to withhold and become more mindful. Truly study those who enjoy long term success in all spheres of their lives and one would realize that delaying pleasure today goes a long way in sustaining pleasure tomorrow. There is a popular statement in the Red Pill that goes, “Good things come to those you wait work” and it is definitely a true statement. However, be aware that though you work hard, it does not equate to instant success. Envision what you want from life, plan, execute but also be patient… true success isn’t a flame – quickly lit and quench – but rather like water – slow to build and slow to empty.